Archive for the Got Me Thinkin’ Category

Mountain Top Moments

Posted in Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Thoughts on Leadership on April 9, 2018 by RobALott

The thing about mountain top moments:

Mountain top moments are great, but they’re fleeting. You can’t stay there long.

The view is amazing and certainly worth the climb! The sense of accomplishment is unparalleled.

But it’s cold. There’s only room for a few people up there, and it can get lonely really fast.

The best and most productive thing you can do in a mountain top moment: Enjoy the view, take it all in, accept the cheers and applause, but then plant your flag and begin to climb down in order to prepare for the next climb.

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Supply & Demand

Posted in A Note to Directors, Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Thoughts on Leadership on March 26, 2018 by RobALott

The problem with the idea of “Supply & Demand” is that we think Supply comes first.

We create and create and create Supply without checking to see if there’s much or any Demand.

Create demand (Psst. That’s vision.)

Then get working on supply.

Introducing the Leading Creative Podcast

Posted in A Note to Directors, Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff, Quotes, Rob Recommends, Thoughts on Leadership on March 12, 2018 by RobALott

I am thrilled to announce that I have begun hosting a brand new podcast!

The Leading Creative Podcast: Bridging the gap between Leadership and Creativity.

Click the link above to listen, subscribe, and share!

Let me know what you think!

Think Like A…

Posted in Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff, Thoughts on Leadership on March 5, 2018 by RobALott

Actors,

Think like an actor, you might do ok.

Think like an actor and a director, you’ll do well.

Think like an actor, a director, and a stage manager, you’ll do just fine.

The Problem with Supply & Demand

Posted in Creativity, Got Me Thinkin' on February 26, 2018 by RobALott

The problem with the idea of “Supply & Demand” is that we think Supply comes first.

We create and create and create Supply without checking to see if there’s much or any Demand.

Create demand (Psst. That’s vision.)

Then get working on supply.

More Is Not Always The Answer

Posted in A Note to Directors, Got Me Thinkin', Thoughts on Leadership on February 12, 2018 by RobALott

In the early days of Saturday Night Live, Lorne Michaels was brought to the top of the NBC Building to meet with some NBC Executives. They had questions about some of the expansions to the budget and production timelines he had requested.

He explained how he felt that a further developed budget and an increase in the production timeline would help the show keep up with growing audience expectations. He feared the show was losing its edge, and was no longer the challenge to the writers, the cast, or the audience it had set out to be. Essentially, the show was on a collision course, Lorne felt, with mediocrity.

An NBC Executive leaned forward, “Let me explain something. You are contracted to produce an hour and a half of programming from 11:30 PM to 1:00 AM every Saturday night. That’s all. No where in your contract does it say that that hour and a half needs to be any good. It doesn’t. Relax. You’re working too hard.”

Lorne smiled and went back to work, but left the show shortly after that.

Here’s what I know:

More money isn’t always the answer.

More time isn’t always the answer.

But lowering the bar, racing to the bottom, decreasing expectation, these things aren’t always the answer either.

Rules of Rehearsal

Posted in A Note to Directors, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff on February 7, 2018 by RobALott

They are theater traditions that have evolved out of necessity of creating a good (and practical) working atmosphere. Some people know them, some people don’t. It’s your job to keep them in play without seeming like a martinet.

1. When people are late, they apologize to the stage manager, the director, and, in extreme cases, the room.

2. People leaving a scene or needing to get to the other side try not to walk in front of where the director is working.

3. Actors should know their lines on the date assigned.

4. People not in the scene should not read or do their taxes in the room. It implies the action is boring.

5. Any offstage conversation should be whispered and short. And don’t run lines out loud.

6. Actors may not leave the general area without checking first with the stage manager.

7. No smoking, no cell phones, no elaborate meals.

8. Don’t direct on the breaks without asking permission. (“May I give you a note?”)

9. Be presentable, wash hair, wash you.

10. Introduce visitors.

Tips by Jon Jory

What would you add to this list?