Archive for the Got Me Thinkin’ Category

I Bet This Never Happens at Disney

Posted in A Note to Directors, Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff, Thoughts on Leadership on July 9, 2018 by RobALott

When things go wrong in other shows at other venues, often the cast or crew will say to me, “I bet stuff like this never happens at Disney.”

The thing is, things go wrong on stages everywhere. Props fail. Quick changes are missed. Scenery malfunctions. It happens.

And it happens at Disney every day.

Every. Day.

Maybe the difference is, and the not so snappy answer is, that we have a whole bunch of plans and contingencies for when things go wrong. And when they go wrong, which they will, we don’t point them out and continuously refer back to the broken element for the audience to see and be reminded.

Do these things happen at Disney?

Yes.

It’s the response and reaction, however, that might be what’s different.

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Beware…

Posted in Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff on July 2, 2018 by RobALott

When performing for your fellow cast becomes of higher value than working together to perform for your audience

…the end is near.

The Trick Of Magic

Posted in A Note to Directors, Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff, Thoughts on Leadership on June 25, 2018 by RobALott

The trick of a good magic trick is not a trick at all, but rather the result of study, practice, rehearsal, and perfecting the gimmick in a way that goes unnoticed. Once one has seen how the trick is accomplished, the illusion loses its luster.

Actually, this is true of all performance. The hard part—the study, the practice, the rehearsal, the perfecting, the part that makes the entertaining impressive—should go unnoticed.

Once we’ve learned and perfected how it’s done, it should be easy. But to our audience, it should be magic.

Change

Posted in A Note to Directors, Creativity, Got Me Thinkin', Thoughts on Leadership on June 18, 2018 by RobALott

People don’t mind change as much as we think they do.

It’s the loss associated with change that gets people upset.

Loss of time.

Loss of space.

Loss of control.

Loss of energy.

Loss of relationship.

If we can point to what is gained due to the change as opposed to what’s lost, it won’t necessarily make the change easier, but it just might make it less painful and not last as long.

(If you can’t find or point to the good resulting from the change, beware. The change might just be change and may not be progress.)

For the Rest of Us…

Posted in Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff on June 11, 2018 by RobALott

Only one person gets to originate a role.

For the rest of us, it will always be of more value to seek out and experience another’s take on a shared role than to avoid it.

There’s intrinsic value in watching someone else do what you do—in seeing what other options and intents are available—in keeping a running list of ideas you’d like to use and make your own, as well as bits you want to make sure never to do.

To dig in one’s feet and to bury one’s head and say: “I don’t want to be influenced by anyone else’s performance. My show is my show and my show alone.” Well, to me, this way of thinking is not actually artistic. It’s misguided and unwise.

To Improve Or To Maintain?

Posted in A Note to Directors, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff, Thoughts on Leadership on June 4, 2018 by RobALott

Were you hired to improve or maintain the situation?

Likewise,

Are you hiring to improve or maintain the situation?

Clarifying the answers to these questions will forego a great deal of confusion and frustration.

The Second Punchline

Posted in Creativity, Disentangling Thoughts on Theatre, Got Me Thinkin', Nuts & Bolts Stuff on May 28, 2018 by RobALott

When you’re just hanging out with your friends, by all means, go with your first joke—your first quip—your first thought of a punchline.

But when you’re onstage, the audience has already thought of that first joke. You, as the professional in the room, need to come up and go with the second joke.

Having the second or third option of a punchline is often what separates the pros from everyone else.