Separation of Talent and Ego (Post from the Past Edition)

I’m on vacation this week! Hooray!

So, I’ve gone into the archives and pulled up a most shared and favorited post from the past.

Maybe you’re a new-to-me reader and you missed this one. Maybe you read it, and shared it, and liked it the first time. Either way, I hope you enjoy this post while I sip my Corona and go off the grid for the next few days.

I think egos have gotten a bad rap.

I don’t know that we will ever be able to separate talent from ego. Not when we are asking people to put their heart, soul, and every emotion they’ve ever had on display for our entertainment and enjoyment. An ego is the required tool for the artist that plans to command attention.

We all have egos. It’s not a bad thing.

Your ego is what made you step into the audition room.

(Is this making you uncomfortable? Relax. It’ll be over soon.)

Of course we’ve all witnessed the ego that got out of control. The ego that wrote checks the talent couldn’t cash. We all know that guy. But, I’m not talking about that guy.

I’m talking about you. You, with the healthy ego masquerading as confidence. The ego that gets things done. The ego that took you years to build. The ego that makes others pay attention when you walk into the room. That ego. Your ego.

It’s not all bad. A lot of it is good. You need it. Keep it in check, and you’ll be fine.

Why am I so pro ego?

Because ego makes art. Without an ego, no one would have the confidence to believe their art is important enough to put out there.

Protect your ego, and protect the egos of the artists around you.

A Note to Directors (and this is just my opinion, but it’s true): We all want the best show possible. And within that show, we want the best performances possible. So yes, give all the direction, and feedback, and notes that you feel you need to give. But at some point in the rehearsal process, you need to give your performers back their confidence. Give them back their confidence so they can step onto the stage and deliver the performance you’ve asked and led them to give.

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